Monthly Archives: August 2017

Back in the Summer of 1960, Part 2

Summer is winding down, but as a Kitchen Traveler you can always be on vacation. Here are a few more Bulgarian recipes from a long-passed summer. As in the last post, Bulgarian recipes of a certain era combine precise metric measurements with a trust that the cook somehow just knows what to do in the way of quantity or oven temperature. Is the “spoonful” a teaspoon or a tablespoon? Only the cook knows. How hot should the oven be? Only the cook knows. How long should the cookies be baked? Until they are done, of course.

And recommending the use of a lemon was pure fantasy since the home cook had no way in 1960 to find a lemon in the market and only once yearly—on the New Year’s holiday—were oranges to be found. The vanilla was and continues to be sold dry in packets, each one being roughly the equivalent of one teaspoonful liquid vanilla extract. By the way, the last line in the Drunken Peaches recipe is not my editorial, but is on the original recipe. Clearly, the recipe was well tested by the publisher.

But my favorite in all these recipes is the measurement provided for baking soda, “the edge of a knife soda for bread.”

Remember that no matter what the recipe includes or excludes, all jars of preserves should be boiled for ten minutes with the water level one inch above the lid before allowing them to cool and be stored.

Drunken Peaches

Ingredients:
2 kg (4½ pounds) sugar
2-3 cups water
3 kg (6½ pounds) peaches, not too ripe, skins removed
½ liter (2 cups) grape rakiya

Directions:
Simmer the sugar and water to form a thick syrup. Place the whole peeled peaches in the syrup. When the syrup returns to the boil, use a slotted spoon to remove the peaches and let them cool. Layer in jars peaches, a little of the syrup, and a little of the grape rakiya (or other fruit brandy), repeating until the jars are full. Cover with parchment paper and cap the jars tightly. Let mature 5-6 weeks. It has a good taste.

Дренки (pronounced “dren-key”) is the fruit of the cornel cherry, a relative of the dogwood. The fruit is small, red, and quite sour. The cornel cherry is native to Eastern Europe. When living in Bulgaria, I used it as a substitute for cranberries at Thanksgiving so you can probably do so the other way around if you wish to try out the recipe below and don’t happen to have a few cornel cherry trees handy.

сироп от дренкиCornel Cherry Syrup

Ingredients:
2 kg (4½ pounds) cornel cherries
1 kg (4 cups) water
1½ kg (3¼ pounds) sugar
½ teaspoon citric acid (or 1 tablespoon lemon juice)

Directions:
Mash the cornel cherries and leave them to ferment together with the pits for 24 hours. The next day, strain through a sieve, and then again through a cloth into a pot. Pour in water, add sugar, and boil until the mixture reaches the desired thickness. Add citric acid (or lemon juice).

татлииSyrup Pastries

Ingredients:
¼ kg lard or butter
1 egg yolk
4 tablespoons yogurt
2½ flour
½ kg (1 pound) sugar
2 cups water
vanilla or lemon rind

Directions:
Cream lard or butter together with the egg yolk. Add the yogurt and flour. Mix until you have a soft dough from which you make walnut-sized balls. Lightly press them with a grater with which lemons are grated; arrange them on a greased baking sheet and bake. While still hot, pour over a syrup made by boiling sugar and water flavored with vanilla or lemon rind.

I translated “ванилички с мармалад” as vanilla sandwich cookies as they literally are called “little vanilla ones with marmalade.” Such an endearment provided the same translation challenge from Bulgarian as translating my brownie recipe from English for my Bulgarian friends.

ваниличкиVanilla Sandwich Cookies
with Marmalade

Ingredients:
200 grams (7 ounces) butter
4 tablespoons powdered sugar
3 cups flour
1 egg
1 egg yolk
rind of 1 lemon
juice of ½ lemon
the edge of a knife baking soda
additional powdered sugar for rolling
2 packets vanilla powder

Directions:
Cream the butter and sugar. When the butter is foamy, add the egg, egg yolk, lemond rind, lemon juice, and baking soda. Mix everything well until there is a smooth dough. Roll the dough to a thickness of ½ cm (just under ¼ inch) and use a rakiya glass to cut out circles, arranging them on a greased baking sheet. Bake in a hot oven until lightly browned. While still hot, stick them together two by two with marmalade or jelly. Roll them in powdered sugar, flavored with two packets of vanilla. It’s good if the sandwich cookies are left overnight in order to soften.

Quince can be very difficult to find even when seasonal, and upscale markets who do sell them do so at a price that this oft ignored sister of the apple family shouldn’t have to bear. Last fall, I had an outdoor market vendor stab the air and venomously accuse the quince of a blight that would kill her apple harvest. Putting even one or two peeled and cut up quince to a pot of applesauce adds flavor. If you can find a few pounds, quince jam is easy to make and store.

сладко от дюлиQuince Jam

Ingredients:
1 kg (2¼ pounds) sugar
300 grams (1¼ cups) water
1 kg (2¼ pounds) quince, peeled and grated on the large size of a box grater
water to which 1 packet citric acid (or 1 tablespoon lemon juice) has been added
citric acid (or 2 teaspoons lemon juice)

Directions:
Boil a syrup from the sugar and water. Into the hot syrup the prepared quince. In order that the peeled quince do not brown as you grate them, let them sit in the water and citric acid (or lemon juice). Boil the jam at high heat until the desired thickness. Before pouring into jars, add additional citric acid or lemon juice.

 

 

Back in the Summer of 1960

Kitchen Traveler—yes, you read it here first. I am officially coining the term (unless of course someone else has beaten me to it) for those that travel through cooking recipes from other countries. If reading books about foreign locales makes you an armchair traveler, then preparing foods from foreign locales makes you a Kitchen Traveler. Even if you have never been to Bulgaria, therefore, you may now find your way there through paths salty and sweet.

I found some old recipes that my mother-in-law might very well have followed as she started out her married life and thought I’d pass them along. Bulgarian recipes of a certain era combine precise metric measurements with, shall we say, slightly less precise direction in keeping with what the cook of the time had available. Forget tablespoon and teaspoon, the recipes below call for a spoonful or the diminutive “little spoonful.” My mother-in-law’s oven did have temperature settings, but I have friends who grew up with ovens that simply had the numbers one through four on the dial to indicate heat gradations. Thus the first recipe calls for baking in a “hot oven.” The tone of the recipes is quite different from those written some years later. These partner with the reader cook—we cut one kilogram onions, we add 1-2 carrots—whereas later recipes use the third person.

The original recipes also are written in paragraph form so that you have to carefully read through them to figure out the ingredients and prep work. My translations show those first, as indeed most Bulgarian recipes published today do, and offer both metric and American standard measurements where applicable. If the measurement references cups, then so does the original and you just have to presume a teacup rather than an espresso coffee cup is what is being referenced. If there is no measurement, that’s because the original offers none, and so you are—as Bulgarian women were then—left to your devices. And if you are offended that I write only of housewives and women, well, that’s how it was in 1960.

Baked Fish

Ingredients:
1 kg (2.2 pounds) onion, cut into thin slices
½ cup fat
1-2 carrots, cut into pieces
garlic, chopped
2 even spoonfuls flour
1 little spoonful paprika
several peppercorns
2-3 bay leaves
1 cup water
salt
tomatoes, sliced
whole cleaned fish rubbed with a little oil and sprinkled flour and paprika

Directions:
Saute onion in fat along with carrots and garlic. When the onion is a golden color, add flour and lightly saute briefly. Add paprika, peppercorns, and bay leaves. Add water and salt, and then pour it all into a large baking pan. Cover the sauteed vegetables with thinly sliced tomatoes. Place prepared fish on top. Bake in a hot oven.

String Beans in the Oven

Ingredients:
1-½ kg (3.3 pounds) fresh string beans
onion, chopped finely
salt
thin paste of 1 spoon flour, paprika, and water
2-3 tomatoes, chopped fine
bunch parsley, chopped fine
water
1-2 eggs
1 cup milk

Directions:
Clean string beans and cut in two length-wise. Steam them in a pot together with onion and salt. When the beans and onion have softened, put them in a baking dish and pour over them the paste of flour, paprika, and water. Add tomatoes, parsley, and enough water to cover the vegetables. Bake in the oven. When the vegetables have browned, pour over them the eggs beaten together with the milk. Bake in the oven again until eggs have cooked. Beans prepared this way are very tasty.

Potatoes Baked with Feta Cheese

Ingredients:
1 kg (2.2 pounds) potatoes, peeled and cut into slices
fat
¼ kg (½ pound) feta cheese, mashed (or kashkaval, a cheddar-type cheese, finely grated)
parsley, finely chopped
1 cup milk
2-3 beaten eggs
garlic (optional)

Directions:
Stew potatoes in fat. Add feta cheese (or kashkaval) and parsley. Beat eggs and milk together and pour over. Bake until browned. If desired, serve with garlic.

Burek–Eggplant

Ingredients:
eggplant, peeled and cut into slices lengthwise
salt
fat
stuffing made from mashed feta cheese, eggs, and bread crumbs
flour for rolling
beaten eggs for dipping
yogurt mixed with chopped garlic

Directions:
Salt eggplant slices and let rest until they release water. Fry them in fat and remove from pan. Take eggplant slices two by two, filling each pair with stuffing. Roll first in flour, then in beaten egg, and sauté in very hot fat. Serve hot with yogurt flavored with garlic.

Baked Plum Confiture

Ingredients:
5 kg (11 pounds) blue plums, pitted
2-½ kg (5-½ pounds) sugar
several cloves
several cinnamon sticks
1-2 cups toasted walnuts (optional)

Directions:
Pour sugar over plums and add cloves and cinnamon sticks. Bake in the oven in a not very high temperature. From time to time, stir so that the top layer does not burn. When the plums become wrinkled and the juice thickens, remove them from the pan, pour into jars, and cover them well with parchment paper. If desired, add walnuts. My Note: Aside from the fact that not once in decades of eating homemade preserves in many Bulgarian homes did I ever see parchment paper used, one should always—and Bulgarians do—cap jars securely and boil for ten minutes before storing.

Next time, I will post recipes for Drunk Peaches, Cornel Cherry Syrup, Syrup Pastries, Vanilla Sandwich Cookies with Marmalade, and Quince Jam—all to make the summer sweeter as it winds down.